Recreational Diving or Scuba

 

Recreational diving or sport diving is a type of diving that uses SCUBA equipment for the purpose of leisure and enjoyment. In some diving circles, the term “recreational diving” is used in contradistinction to “technical diving”, a more demanding aspect of the sport which requires greater levels of training, experience and equipment.

Recreational diving or sport diving is a type of diving that uses SCUBA equipment for the purpose of leisure and enjoyment. In some diving circles, the term “recreational diving” is used in contradistinction to “technical diving”, a more demanding aspect of the sport which requires greater levels of training, experience and equipment.

 

Recreational scuba diving grew out of related activities such as snorkelling and underwater hunting. For a long time, recreational underwater excursions were limited by the amount of breath that could be held. However, the invention of the aqualung in 1943 by Jacques-Yves Cousteau and the wetsuit in 1953 by Georges Beuchat and its development over subsequent years led to a revolution in recreational diving. However, for much of the 1950s and early 1960s, recreational scuba diving was a sport limited to those who were able to afford or make their own kit, and prepared to undergo intensive training to use it.

As the sport became more popular, manufacturers became aware of the potential market, and equipment began to appear that was easy to use, affordable and reliable. Continued advances in SCUBA technology, such as buoyancy compensators, modern diving regulators, wet or dry suits, and dive computers, increased the safety, comfort and convenience of the gear encouraging more people to train and use it. Today, PADI alone issues approximately 950,000 diving certifications a year (wikipedia).

 

Leave a Reply